Charlie Daniels: Country and Southern Rock Legend Dies at Age 83




Charlie Daniels, who went from being an in-demand session musician to a staple of southern rock with his hit The Devil Went Down to Georgia, has died at 83.


A statement from his publicist said the Country Music Hall of Famer died Monday at a hospital in Hermitage, Tenn., after doctors said he had a stroke.


He had suffered what was described as a mild stroke in January 2010 and had a heart pacemaker implanted in 2013 but continued to perform.


Charles Edward Daniels (October 28, 1936 – July 6, 2020) was an American singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist known for his contributions to Southern rock, country, and bluegrass music. He was best known for his number-one country hit "The Devil Went Down to Georgia". Daniels was active as a singer and musician since the 1950s.





He was inducted into the Cheyenne Frontier Days Hall of Fame in 2002, the Grand Ole Opry in 2008, the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum in 2009, and the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2016.





Daniels was successfully treated for prostate cancer in 2001. On January 15, 2010, Daniels was rushed to the hospital after suffering a stroke while snowmobiling in Colorado. He recovered and was released two days later. During a doctor visit on March 25, 2013, Daniels was diagnosed with a mild case of pneumonia and admitted to a Nashville hospital for a series of routine tests.


The tests revealed that a pacemaker was needed to regulate his heart rate. One was put in on March 28 and Daniels was released from hospital within days.





Daniels died on July 6, 2020, of a hemorrhagic stroke at the age of 83 at Summit Medical Center in Nashville.







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