Procol Harum - Conquistador - Live at RTBF TV 1973 (Remastered)

Procol Harum - Conquistador - Live at RTBF TV 1973 (Remastered)





Procol Harum are a British rock band. Formed in 1967, they contributed to the development of progressive rock, and by extension, symphonic rock. Their best-known recording is their 1967 single "A Whiter Shade of Pale". Although noted for its baroque and classical influence, Procol Harum's music also embraces the blues, R&B and soul. In October 2012, the band were nominated for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, but were unsuccessful on this occasion.


"Conquistador" is a song by the British progressive rock band Procol Harum. Written by Gary Brooker and Keith Reid, it originally appeared on the band's 1967 self-titled debut album. It was released as a single off the band's 1972 album Procol Harum Live In Concert with the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra. It is one of the band's most famous and popular songs and their second Top 40 hit (after "A Whiter Shade of Pale"), peaking at number 16 on the Billboard Hot 100.








Lyrics



Conquistador your stallion stands

In need of company

And like some angel's haloed brow

You reek of purity

I see your armour-plated breast

Has long since lost it's sheen

And in your death mask face

There are no signs which can be seen


And though I hoped for something to find

I could see no maze to unwind


Conquistador a vulture sits

Upon your silver shield

And in your rusty scabbard now

The sand has taken seed

And though your jewel-encrusted blade

Has not been plundered still

The sea has washed across your face

And taken of it's fill


And though I hoped for something to find

I could see no maze to unwind


Conquistador there is no time

I must pay my respect

And though I came to jeer at you

I leave now with regret

And as the gloom begins to fall

I see there is no, only all

And though you came with sword held high

You did not conquer, only die


And though I hoped for something to find

I could see no maze to unwind



Songwriters: Gary Brooker / Keith Reid




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